About Labradoodles

Lighthouse Starlight and Lighthouse

Kiwi – two beautiful girls.

HISTORY

Wally Conran, a breeder of guide dogs in Melbourne, Australia, was the first person to purposefully mate a labrador retriever and a standard poodle (the large kind) in 1988. A woman in Hawaii had requested a Guide Dog for her disabled husband with allergies. It took a while for Conran to hit upon the right mix, but the first litter produced three puppies, one of whose hair and saliva did not affect the man’s allergies.

He began breeding and cross-breeding the Labradoodles, which were in high demand almost immediately. “The mix reputedly combines the intelligence, aloof nature, the delicate frame, and the low-allergy, and non-shedding traits of the poodle with the boisterous exuberance, lovability, and loyalty of a lab.

TWO TYPES OF LABRADOODLES

Labradoodles and Australian Labradoodles can be very different depending on the type (resulting from the parents and grandparents). It is very important to understand the type and background of your labradoodle or Australian Labradoodle!

There are two ways to describe Labradoodles and Australian Labradoodles.

A Labradoodle is the result of breeding the Labrador Retriever to a Poodle, Labradoodle to Poodle, or Labradoodle to Labradoodle. Basically the Labradoodle has Labrador Retriever and Poodle only DNA, nothing else.

An Australian Labradoodle is the result of breeding a Labradoodle (Labrador Poodle only cross) originally but adding in Cocker Spaniel (American or English).

This maintained the larger boning but brought the incredible soft fleece coat.

Labradoodles can be Standard, Medium and sometimes Miniature although toy poodle use is not recommended. All colors of the poodle can be found in the Labradoodle. Coat types include various waves of straight, loose to a tight curl.  The coat texture ranges as well from a harsh wool, softer fleece (not as silky as the fleece of the Australian Labradoodle), or hair coats (slightly longer but more like the Labrador coat). The non-shedding or low shedding fleece and wool should be brushed weekly due to matting and groomed bi monthly, while the hair coat, which does shed, requires less grooming.

Australian Labradoodles can be Standard, Medium or Miniature. All colors of the poodle can be found in the Australian Labradoodle. Coat types include various waves of straight, loose or tight curl. The coat texture ranges from wool, soft wool to a silky fleece. The non-shedding or very low shedding fleece and wool should be brushed weekly due to matting and groomed bi monthly.

Here at Lighthouse Labradoodles we are in the early stages of our breeding program and initially will have both types of this beautiful dog but eventually hope to be breeding only the Australian Labradoodle.

 

LABRADOODLE COAT TYPES:

 

FLEECE: The Fleece coat of an Australian Labradoodle hangs down in ‘tendrils’ loosely from the body of the dog. It will flow and ripple as the dog moves, which is the true test of the Fleece coat as opposed to the Wool coat. Fleece coats are typically low to non-shedding.The Fleece coat texture should be light and silky quite similar to that of an Angora goat.

 

WOOL: Coats are more dense to the touch, like a sheep’s wool. The “Ideal” wool coat should hang in loose hollow spirals  The Australian labradoodle has a single coat. Both the Fleece and the wool coat should naturally grow in “staples” and be of a soft texture. Wool coats are usually non-shedding.

 

HAIR: The hair coat has odor and sheds in varying degrees. It is most like the coat type of Labradors. It is usually seen in early generation dogs such as the first cross of a lab and poodle, F1b, and F2b Labradoodles. It’s not always a good choice for families with allergy and asthma. However, for those families that want little brushing and grooming responsibilities, it should be considered as an option.

 

 

COLOURS OF THE AUSTRALIAN LABRADOODLE:

 

These days you can find the Australian Labradoodle in a number of different and beautiful colours. It is normal that all colours may show bleaching and discolouration over the topcoat, this is expected and accepted.

Chalk  –  This colour should be a white colour but when compared to white is rather a chalky white in colour. Nose pigment to be Black or Rose

Gold – This colour has also been referred to, as “apricot” should be the colour of the inside of a ripe apricot to varying shades of rich Gold in colour. A true Gold should not have a lighter root than the outer coat and preferably have an even colouration over the entire body. This colour may fade as the dog grows older. Nose pigment to be Black in colour.

Caramel – This colour ranges from a rich gold through to a deep red the preferred colour is very much the same colour as its namesake “caramel” with even colouration over the entire body. Nose pigment to be Rose in colour.

Red – This colour should be a solid even rich red in colour.  A true red should not be lighter at the root than the outer coat.  Reds can fade as the dog grows older. Nose pigment to be Black.

Black – This colour should be a solid black in colour and should not have sprinkling of any other colour through the coat. Nose pigment to be Black.

Blue – This colour should be dark to medium smoky blue in colour.  Blues are born black but will have a Blue/Grey skin pigment.  The blue coat colour will develop over time but as a developed adult should have an even coat colour.  Nose pigment should be Blue/Grey.

Silver – This colour can range in shades from very light pewter in colour to a dark charcoal in colour, it is preferred to see an even colour through the coat but acceptable to see uneven layering of colour in the coat. Silvers are born Black with the coat colour developing over time. Nose pigment to be Black.

Chocolate – This colour should be a dark rich chocolate in colour.  True chocolates are born almost black in colour and maintain the rich dark colour throughout their lifetime.  Colour should be even.  Nose pigment to be Rose in colour [matching the coat colour].

Cafe – This colour ranges from a milk chocolate to silver-beige in colour and will develop over time (1-3yrs). Nose pigment to be Rose in colour [matching the coat colour].

Lavender – This colour has a definite smoky lavender chocolate colour giving an almost pink to lilac appearance. Lavender dogs are born chocolate and will develop over time (1-3yrs). Nose pigment to be Rose in colour [matching the coat colour].

Parchment – This colour is a creamy beige chocolate colour reminiscent of a cup of coffee with a generous addition of milk. Parchment dogs are born milk chocolate and will develop over time (1-3yrs). From a distance adult dogs can be mistaken for a dark or smoky cream. Nose pigment to be Rose in colour.

Parti – Parti-coloured: At least fifty percent white, with spots or patches of any other acceptable solid colour. The head can be of a solid colour but white muzzle, blaze, or white muzzle/blaze combination (preferably symmetrical) are equally acceptable. Full or partial saddles are acceptable, as long as they do not exceed the colour proportion, but are not preferred. Ticking in the white of the coat is acceptable but not preferred. Any colour nose pigment acceptable but preferable to follow pigment requirements of the patch colour colour.

Phantom – Solid base colour with sharply defined markings of a second colour appearing above each eye, on the sides of the muzzle, on the throat and forechest, or in a chin and forechest bowtie pattern as well as on all four legs and feet, and below the tail. A phantom without clearly defined face markings or one that presents with its whole face coloured in the second colour is acceptable, as long as it maintains all the other specified body markings. Any combination of acceptable colours is allowed. Nose pigment to follow pigment requirements of the Solid base colour.

 

LABRADOODLE SIZES:

Australian Labradoodles are bred to three sizes:

Miniature: 14″ –16″ (not over 17″) (or about 35-42 cms) at the shoulder. There is no correlation between height and gender in the Miniature size. Weight range is in the range 7-12 kg (or about 15-25 lbs).

Medium: 17″ –20″ (not over 21″) (or about 43-52 cms) at the shoulder. The ideal size for the female is 17-19″ and the male is 19″ –20″ . Weight range is 13-20 kg (or about 30-45 lbs).

Standard: 21″ –24″ (not over 25″) (or about 53-63 cms) at the shoulder. The ideal size for the female is 21″ –23″ and the male is 22″ –24″. Weight range is 23-30 kg (about 50-65 lbs).